Learning and Brain Development Lab

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Learning & Brain
Development Lab

Infant and Child Research Opportunities

These studies explore how prior experiences and the environment impact how children pay attention and learn!

Attention to Caregivers in Infancy

Ages: 4 months; 6 months; 8 months

3 Visits, 60-90 minutes

This study looks at how and why infants’ attention to their caregiver changes over the first year of life. Families who participate are asked to visit our lab three times, when infants are 4 months, 6 months, and 8 months old. During the visits, infants and their caregivers do several activities together:

  • Caregivers complete a series of questionnaires that ask about topics including family sociodemographic information, typical behavior, the makeup of your child’s social network, events that you may have experienced in the past, and how you have been feeling in the past couple of weeks.
  • Infants view a couple of short movies in which shapes, objects or faces appear on the screen. We will use a non-invasive eye tracker to record where your child looks as they view the display.
  • Next, infants play with several standard infant toys while we record where they are looking.
  • Infants and caregivers play together while we use a non-invasive EKG device to measure infants’ heart rate.

Are you expecting or caring for a baby under four months? Sign up to stay in touch and get updates as your baby grows!

Race-Based Attention Orienting Biases in Infancy

Ages: 5-6 months; 10-11 months

1 Visit, 1 Hour

In this study, infants will view an array containing multiple images appearing on a computer screen. Each array will contain both faces and non-face objects. We will use a non-invasive eye tracker to record where your child looks as they view the display.

Attention and Learning in Childhood

Ages: 3-5 years

1 Visit, 1 Hour

In this study, children will view educational lessons on a computer screen. Lessons will include auditory and visual information. We will use a non-invasive eye tracker to record where your child looks as they view the display.

Not interested in or eligible for our current studies? Stay connected by joining our contact list. We’ll keep you informed about future research opportunities that you or your children might be interested in!

Attention to Caregivers in Infancy

Ages: 4 months; 6 months; 8 months

3 Visits, 60-90 minutes

This study looks at how and why infants’ attention to their caregiver changes over the first year of life. Families who participate are asked to visit our lab three times, when infants are 4 months, 6 months, and 8 months old. 

During the visits, infants and their caregivers do several activities together:

  • Caregivers complete a series of questionnaires that ask about topics including family sociodemographic information, typical behavior, the makeup of your child’s social network, events that you may have experienced in the past, and how you have been feeling in the past couple of weeks.
  • Infants view a couple of short movies in which shapes, objects or faces appear on the screen. We will use a non-invasive eye tracker to record where your child looks as they view the display.
  • Next, infants play with several standard infant toys while we record where they are looking.
  • Infants and caregivers play together while we use a non-invasive EKG device to measure infants’ heart rate.

Are you expecting or caring for a baby under four months? Sign up to stay in touch and get updates as your baby grows!

Race-Based Attention Orienting Biases in Infancy

Ages: 5-6 months; 10-11 months

1 Visit, 1 Hour

In this study, infants will view an array containing multiple images appearing on a computer screen. Each array will contain both faces and non-face objects. We will use a non-invasive eye tracker to record where your child looks as they view the display.

Attention and Learning in Childhood

Ages: 3-5 years

1 Visit, 1 Hour

In this study, children will view educational lessons on a computer screen. Lessons will include auditory and visual information. We will use a non-invasive eye tracker to record where your child looks as they view the display.

Not interested in or eligible for our current studies? Stay connected by joining our contact list. We’ll keep you informed about future research opportunities that you or your children might be interested in!